Pages Navigation Menu

Québec City, Île d’Orléans and the Beaupré Coast

Parliament fountain in commemoration of Québec City 400th birthday celebration
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Pinterest
  • StumbleUpon

Tourny Fountain was built with the $4 million gift from the owners of the Simons Department Store to the city for its 400th anniversary.

Four centuries have passed since explorer Samuel de Champlain became the Father of New France. He established a colony and opened a fur trade network with the indigenous people, who called the area Kebec, “where the river narrows”.

Québec City is the only fortified city in North America and is known as the Gibraltar of North America for its strategic importance in the struggles for control between the French and British. Within and around these city walls is an Old World ambience rivaling far more distant capitals.

Place Royale, Quebec City
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Pinterest
  • StumbleUpon

Notre-Dame-des-Victoires Church, the oldest stone church in North America (1688), Place Royale, Quebec City

Merchants built stone houses in the Lower Town near the port of the St. Lawrence River. This area is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, the only one in Canada. Reconstructions along the narrow winding cobblestone streets are meticulously maintained and are now the site of trendy restaurants, shops with local crafts and souvenirs, or residences for some of the 4000 people who live within the city walls.

Lower Town, Quebec City
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Pinterest
  • StumbleUpon

Rue Sous-le-Fort, Lower Town, Quebec City

The many steeples in the city skyline are testament to the strong role of the Catholic Church. Early colonizers were required to attend church daily and expected to populate the new colony.

view of Quebec City and the Chateau Frontenac from Holland America’s Maasdam
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Pinterest
  • StumbleUpon

view of Quebec City and the Chateau Frontenac from Holland America’s Maasdam

Quebec City exudes the charm and continental flair at any time, with its beautiful gardens and founding language, French, still spoken today. During any of its festivals it sizzles with a special excitement.

family fun at Quebec City's 400th Anniversary Celebration
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Pinterest
  • StumbleUpon

family fun at Quebec City’s 400th Anniversary Celebration

bagpipers, Québec City 400th Anniversary
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Pinterest
  • StumbleUpon

bagpipers, Québec City 400th Anniversary

In 2008, the Canadians pulled out all the stops in creating an exceptional year-long celebration.

Russian dancers, Québec City 400th Anniversary, Canada
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Pinterest
  • StumbleUpon

Russian dancers, Québec City 400th Anniversary, Canada

Russian Alexandrov Red Army Choir and Ensemble, Québec City 400th Anniversary, Canada
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Pinterest
  • StumbleUpon

Russian Alexandrov Red Army Choir and Ensemble, Québec City 400th Anniversary, Canada

Russian dancers, Québec City 400th Anniversary, Canada
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Pinterest
  • StumbleUpon

Russian dancers, Québec City 400th Anniversary, Canada

Russian Alexandrov Red Army Choir and Ensemble, Québec City 400th Anniversary, Canada
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Pinterest
  • StumbleUpon

Russian Alexandrov Red Army Choir and Ensemble, Québec City 400th Anniversary, Canada

Russian Alexandrov Red Army Choir and Ensemble, Québec City 400th Anniversary, Canada
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Pinterest
  • StumbleUpon

Russian Alexandrov Red Army Choir and Ensemble, Québec City 400th Anniversary, Canada

Military Tattoo, Quebec City's 400th Anniversary Celebration
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Pinterest
  • StumbleUpon

Military Tattoo, Quebec City’s 400th Anniversary Celebration

Korean musicians, Quebec City's 400th Anniversary, Canada
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Pinterest
  • StumbleUpon

Korean musicians, Quebec City’s 400th Anniversary, Canada

Korean musicians and dancers, Quebec City's 400th Anniversary, Canada
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Pinterest
  • StumbleUpon

Korean musicians and dancers, Quebec City’s 400th Anniversary, Canada

In recognition of this quadricentennial over $150 million has been spent in creating new and improved public spaces throughout Quebec City. Most noticeable is the creation of more public space along the waterfront as a gift for generations to come.

Dufferin Terrace, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Pinterest
  • StumbleUpon

Dufferin Terrace, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada

Four centuries of history, culture, and encounters are being celebrated, renowned exhibits and performers have been drawn from throughout the world, and festivals have been taken to new levels. From the art of great civilizations on loan from the Louvre at the Fine Arts Museum to the history revealed in Robert Lepage’s Image Mill, the world’s largest outdoor architectural projection, this celebratory year is one not to be missed.

Image Mill, Quebec City's 400th Anniversary, Canada
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Pinterest
  • StumbleUpon

Robert Lepage’s Image Mill, the largest architectural projection ever mounted, Quebec City’s 400th Anniversary celebration, Canada

The park area known as the Plains of Abraham was given by Canadian government to commemorate Quebec City’s 300th year. Also known as Battlefields Park, it is one of the world’s largest urban parks, and commemorates the historic battles between Wolfe and Montcalm in 1759 and Murray and Lévis in 1760. Recent performances there by Paul McCartney July 20 and Celine Dion August 22 each drew about a quarter of a million people.

This historic city is also environmentally aware.  80% of Quebec Province’s electricity is hydroelectric, and some of the surplus is sold to places like the Boston area.

Touring the city

For a tour that brings the city to life through history, legends, and amusing anecdotes, there’s nothing better than having your own guide. Cicerone is a small company that offers tours from various hotels and personalized guide services.

Our guide, Marie Michèle, was dressed in character, as one of the “filles du roi”, or “King’s daughters”, who were orphans given a dowry and sent by Louis XIV to populate New France. Most were married within two weeks of their arrival. Others became nuns. Beautifully costumed Rose-Marie, arriving at age 12, was among the more fortunate. She married an officer in his 30s and had ten children.

goat, Quebec City 400th
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Pinterest
  • StumbleUpon

The Citadel’s Royal 22nd’s Regimental goat and mascot, Batisse, a descendant of the goat presented by Queen Elizabeth in 1955.

Outside the City

The scenic Beaupré coast is bordered by the St. Lawrence River and runs from Montmorency Falls to Mont-Sainte-Anne.

Montmorency Falls, at 83 meters or nearly 100 feet, is higher than Niagara Falls. The area was frequented in summer by Queen Victoria’s father, the Duke of Kent, who was involved in a controversial romance with woman said to be most beautiful in New France.

The statue of St. Anne at Sainte Anne de Beaupré Basilica, has been credited with performing miracles for the sick and disabled.

Basilique Sainte Anne de Beaupre, Quebec, Canada
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Pinterest
  • StumbleUpon

Basilique Sainte Anne de Beaupré, Quebec, Canada

The coat of arms of Île d’Orléans reads J’accueille et je nourris” (I welcome and feed), which aptly describes this island of farms, vineyards, cider mills, cheese factories, and artists.

It was called “enchanted area” by the indigenous people and “Island of Bacchus” by Cartier for its wine. Later Cartier named it Orleans Island for the Duke of Orleans, son of Francois I. General Wolfe was headquartered in 1759.

Île d'Orleans, Quebec
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Pinterest
  • StumbleUpon

Île d’Orleans, Quebec

 

Agrotourism flourishes. Sample locally grown or made cider, wine, cheeses, fruits, chocolate, and ice cream in this countryside setting, a short drive from Old Quebec. Dine with gentle breezes and a view of the city at Auberge la Goélichea, in the Sainte-Pétronille area, where the first pier was built.

Cassis Monna & Filles, Île d’Orleans, Quebec
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Pinterest
  • StumbleUpon

Cassis Monna & Filles, Île d’Orleans

Graze along the Gourmet Route, sampling the area’s products. Stop at a vineyard for a wine tasting. Try the locally produced black currant liqueur known as cassis.

Kir Royale, Cassis Monna & Filles, Île d’Orleans
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Pinterest
  • StumbleUpon

Kir Royale, Cassis Monna & Filles, Île d’Orleans

Pick your own fruit, bring jams and syrups and pâtés home to friends, sample a variety of ciders and other apple products, and end the day with ice cream topped with chocolate.

Jamelade, Tigidou, Île d’Orleans, Quebec
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Pinterest
  • StumbleUpon

Jamelade, Tigidou, Île d’Orleans, Quebec

Dining

Quebec City, just 300 miles from Boston, is known for its fine cuisine. In the Old Quebec area favored by tourists, even a lavish dinner or a simple snack becomes a taste of history.

Prime Beef filet, Ratte Potato with Garlic Flower, Seasonal Vegetables and Mushrooms, Black Pepper Juice, Champlain dining room, Château Frontenac
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Pinterest
  • StumbleUpon

Prime Beef filet, Ratte Potato with Garlic Flower, Seasonal Vegetables and Mushrooms, Black Pepper Juice, Champlain dining room, Château Frontenac

Restaurant Aux Anciens Canadians Quebec City, Canada
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Pinterest
  • StumbleUpon

Restaurant Aux Anciens Canadians Quebec City, Canada

Two other areas that are becoming increasingly trendy for dining are St. Joseph Street and Nouvo St.-Roch. Ashton is considered the best place for traditional Quebec poutine.

Our favorite place for outstanding cuisine? Walk a few blocks beyond the more touristy area of Grande Allée to Rue Cartier and Restaurant Graffiti. Be sure to make a reservation. This restaurant fills quickly with locals.

 

 

 

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This

Share This

Share this post with your friends!